Philip C

About Me or What I Like Most About T-Trak

I'm from Australia, although I lived in the USA from 1999 to 2016, for most of that time in the Washington DC area.

I've been modelling in N scale since I was 14. Like many Australian N scalers, I started out modelling American railroads, mainly Union Pacific since there was plenty of ready-to-run equipment available. I began modelling Japanese railways in 1995 after my first visit there, and this has since become my main modelling interest. I've also started to do some Australian modelling in the last few years.

My first encounter with T-Trak was through an article in the Japanese magazine RM Models, describing the first publicly shown T-Trak layout at the 2001 JAM Convention. I thought it looked like a great idea, but would probably never take off outside Japan. Happily, that proved not to be the case.

I joined Northern Virginia N-Trak not long after I moved to Washington, and the club hosted the Capitol Convention in 2004. A delegation from Japan was at the convention, and they brought a loop of T-Trak modules to show as a demonstration. Japan Rail Modellers of Washington DC was formed about the same time, and the first club outing was to attend the convention.

I started building T-Trak modules in 2008, and in Washington, I had enough Japanese-themed modules to make a stand-alone layout that included a loop and two branches with terminal stations.

What I most like about T-Trak is that the modules are highly portable and easy to work on, can be completed in a short amount of time, and the flexibility of layout designs resulting from the use of modules.

My Modules

The following modules were built by me:

Module Type
Kawanaga Single
Nishi Kawanaga Single
Rice Farm Single Crossover
Bus Depot Single
Hospital Single
Shrine Festival Single
Service Station Corner Corner
Temple Corner Corner
Substation Junction Corner Junction
Onsen Junction Corner Junction
Kibuneguchi T1-Trak Single
Kurama Double Terminus
Kitano Station Single Terminus
Kitano Crossover Single Crossover
Tokei Dai Single Tramway
Altstadt Double
Russian Village Double
Frampton Single
Akashijima Double

My Trains

Below are some trains that I run on T-Trak layouts:

Japan

Kirara.JPG
Eizan Dentetsu Kirara 900's.
Eiden.JPG
Eizan Dentetsu 300 and 600.
Randen.JPG
Keifuku Railway MoBo 101s and MoBo 621s. The cars on the curve are in the standard paint scheme.
Keihan.JPG
Keihan Electric Railway 600 and 60.
Ohmi.JPG
Ohmi Railway trains. The prototype for the ED14 boxcab electric was built by General Electric in 1926 and exported to Japan.
Nankai.JPG
Nankai Railway 20000 and 21000.
Wakayama.JPG
Wakayama Electric Railway Ichigoden and Tamaden (Strawberry train and Tama train). Ichigoden represents the strawberries that grow along the line. Tama is a cat who was made the stationmaster at Kiso, which is the last station on the line. A new station was built in the shape of a cat's face, and Kiso has become a tourist attraction, greatly improving the fortunes of the company.
Kotoden.JPG
Kotoden 700 and 600. These run in the city of Takamatsu on Shikoku.

Australia

48101.JPG
NSW State Rail Authority 48 Class diesels (Goodwin-Alco DL531s). These are produced by Gopher Models, and are the first ready to run N scale plastic models of a specifically Australian locomotive.
44201.JPG
NSW State Rail Authority 442 Class (Goodwin-Alco DL500G).
TClass.JPG
V/Line T Class Series 3 (Clyde-EMD G8). This is a ready to run model produced by Aust-N-Rail. The body shell is resin with brass handrails, window frames and cab roof, running on a Kato NW2 mechanism.
AN.JPG
Australian National Railways EL Class (Goninan-GE C30-8) with Trailerail train, and Iron Triangle Limited Budd railcar.

Canada

Renaissance.JPG
VIA P42 and Renaissance coaches. The coaches are British Mark IVs (as are the prototypes) made by Graham Farish, with Electra Railway Graphics full body decals. This is a corridor train which would typically run between Montreal and Quebec City.

Germany

425.JPG
ET425 S-Bahn train.
642.JPG
BR642 Siemens Desiro diesel railcar.
643.JPG
BR643 Bombardier TALENT diesel railcar. For a long time, this was my only European train. It can also be Canadian, as the O-Train in Ottawa is the same.

Russia

VL80.JPG
VL80 Electric. This is a Del Prado static model powered with a Tomytec mechanism. It's not very accurate, but fanstastic for the small amount of money it cost. The prototypes generally run in pairs. All Soviet-era electrics are designated "VL", which stands for Vladimir Lenin. The freight cars are made by Red Star Railways.
M62.jpg
RZD M62.
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License